Little to no proof police carding has effect on crime or arrests: Ontario report

Posted
January 2, 2019

Police street checks widely known as carding have little to no value as a law enforcement tool and should be significantly limited across Ontario, a judge tasked with reviewing the practice said Monday.

The report from Justice Michael Tulloch outlines certain circumstances in which police may have legitimate grounds to conduct street checks, or stop people at random and request identifying information.

But Tulloch, who was hired by Ontario's previous Liberal government to assess the effectiveness of new regulations meant to limit the impact of street checks on racialized groups, said those circumstances are very specific and the practice as a whole should be sharply curtailed.

"There is little to no evidence that a random, unfocused collection of identifying information has benefits that outweigh the social cost of the practice," Tulloch wrote in his 310-page report.

"Given the social cost involved with a practice that has not definitively been shown to widely reduce or solve crime, it is recommended that the practice of randomly stopping individuals to gather their identifying information for the creation of a database for intelligence purposes be discontinued."

Tulloch, who previously led a review into Ontario's complex police oversight system, was asked to turn his attention to carding months after the previous government made moves to eliminate what it described as systemic racism in law enforcement.

Read more: Little to no proof police carding has effect on crime or arrests: Ontario report