'Urgent actions' needed to address violence against Indigenous women and girls — UN report

Posted
April 27, 2018

The United Nations special rapporteur on violence against women had some strong words for Canada at the end of her 13-day visit, saying the country has "unfinished business that requires urgent actions."

In presenting her preliminary findings on Monday in Ottawa, Dubravka Simonovic said violence against women in Canada remains a "serious pervasive and systematic problem." 

Her visit involved looking into violence against women overall in Canada. But she spent a considerable amount of time speaking specifically to immediate actions that should be taken in addressing the safety and well-being of Indigenous women and girls.

"Indigenous women from First Nations, Métis and Inuit communities are overtly disadvantaged within their societies and in the larger national scheme," she wrote in her end of mission statement. 

"Indigenous women face marginalization, exclusion and poverty because of institutional, systemic, multiple, intersecting forms of discrimination that has not been addressed adequately by the State."

In particular, she said Canada needs to address the root causes that lead to disproportionate levels of violence against Indigenous women and girls.

'Being Indigenous and female is a risk'

During Simonovic's time in Canada she met with federal, provincial and territorial governments, independent institutions and advisory boards. 

She visited women's shelters, correctional facilities and had a conference call with the chief commissioner of the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, Marion Buller. 

Read more: 'Urgent actions' needed to address violence against Indigenous women and girls — UN report