Two groups seek intervener status at former child refugee Abdoul Abdi’s judicial review

Posted
May 30, 2018
Article Source
Toronto Star

Two advocacy groups are seeking to intervene in the judicial review of the case of Abdoul Abdi, a former Somali child refugee fighting to stay in Canada.

Lawyers for the Canadian Civil Liberties Association and Justice for Children and Youth argued in Federal Court on Tuesday that their groups would offer unique perspectives about the issues surrounding Abdi's case.

The Canada Border Services Agency detained Abdi, who was never granted Canadian citizenship while growing up in foster care in Nova Scotia, after he served about five years in prison for multiple offences including aggravated assault.

The application for judicial review seeks to challenge the government's decision to refer his case to a deportation hearing, arguing the decision was unreasonable, unfair and contrary to the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and international law.

Both groups argued before Justice Ann Marie McDonald in Halifax that their positions would assist the court in arriving at a decision in Abdi's case -- one they claim will have wider implications for vulnerable youth in Canada.

"Young people who have grown up in the care of various child welfare organizations across the country are often placed in a position where they are not provided with adequate protection, in the sense that they haven't been provided with an opportunity to apply for Canadian citizenship," Jane Stewart, a lawyer for the Justice for Children and Youth, said outside court.

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