Goodale orders tougher rules on prisoner transfers to Indigenous lodges following McClintic uproar

Posted
November 7, 2018

Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale has ordered Canada's prison system to tighten transfer policies in the wake of the controversial decision to move child killer Terri-Lynne McClintic to an Indigenous healing lodge.

But it's not yet clear when, or if, McClintic will be transferred back to a conventional women's prison, or if she has already been transferred.

Goodale said Correctional Service Canada has been instructed to improve policies related to transfers of "medium-security women offenders to facilities that do not have a directly controlled perimeter."

"These changes will help ensure the public's confidence that our correctional system is holding guilty parties accountable for breaking the law‎, while fostering their rehabilitation, so we can have fewer repeat offenders, fewer victims, and ultimately safer communities," Goodale said in a statement.

McClintic, who is serving a life sentence for the brutal rape and murder of eight-year-old Tori Stafford of Woodstock, Ont., was transferred from the Grand Valley Institution for Women near Kitchener, Ont., to the Okima Ohci Healing Lodge for Aboriginal Women on Nekaneet First Nation in southern Saskatchewan.

She is not eligible for parole until 2031.

Read more: Goodale orders tougher rules on prisoner transfers to Indigenous lodges following McClintic uproar