Business groups urge government to consider workplace safety in marijuana rules

Posted
November 7, 2017
Article Source
Toronto Star

New rules for legalized marijuana need to consider the impact on workplaces and clarify the rights of both employers and employees, say some business groups.

Ottawa has set July 1 as the deadline for regulations to be in place and many provinces and territories are still working to craft legislation, including British Columbia, where a public consultation on legal pot wrapped up this week.

Anita Huberman, CEO of the Surrey Board of Trade, said large and small companies need guidance from the provincial and federal governments on how they should balance employee privacy with safety in the workplace.

"For any employer, what are their rights and responsibilities in the face of an employee who is under the influence of cannabis?" she said.

"How is an employer supposed to be able to deal with that type of situation without compromising their business and their workplace?"

Huberman said the board of trade wants to see the provincial Employment Standards Act amended to specifically address marijuana usage.

The law does not include any provisions on marijuana, although WorkSafeBC regulations prohibit workers with any physical or mental impairments from doing work that could pose harm to themselves or anyone else.

The rules also say employers cannot allow anyone at a workplace to stay if their ability to work is impaired by alcohol, a drug or any other substance that could put anyone in danger.

Those rules apply to workplaces in B.C., but regulations for legalized marijuana should be standardized across the country, Huberman said.

"In every province, in every territory, we want to make sure this is done right," she said, adding that creating the right rules may take more time than the federal government's timeline allows.