Black students hindered by academic streaming, suspensions: Report

Posted
April 25, 2017
Article Source
Toronto Star

Black children in the GTA may start kindergarten feeling confident and excited to learn, but too many are "gradually worn down" by schools that stream them into applied courses and suspend them at much higher rates than other students, says a new report from York University.

The report found that while academic streaming was supposed to have ended in 1999, black students are twice as likely to be enrolled in applied instead of academic courses compared to their counterparts from other racial backgrounds. And they are more than twice as likely to have been suspended from school at least once during high school.

"Black students face an achievement and opportunity gap in GTA schools," says the study led by York University professor Carl James.

"All evidence point(s) to the need for action if the decades-old problem is to be addressed."

The findings were based on data from the Toronto District School Board — the only board to regularly collect race-based statistics, though a similar move is underway at the Peel District School Board. Consultations with 324 black parents, community members, educators, school trustees and students indicated "the same patterns exist in other GTA school boards," said James.

Because much of the information in the 80-page report was produced by the TDSB's research department, it comes as no surprise to director of education John Malloy.

"We aren't running away from what the data is telling us, we're willing to face it," he said in an interview.

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