News from Toronto Star

The Toronto Star is Canada's highest-circulation newspaper, based in Toronto.

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Double-dipping lawyers in Ontario may be thing of the past

The Law Society of Upper Canada is tackling the issue of how personal injury lawyers get paid.

Posted:
June 27, 2017

Federal government passes law to end 'second-class citizenship'

Ottawa has passed citizenship changes that critics say strike the right balance between removing barriers for immigrants to become full Canadians and protecting the integrity of the system.

Posted:
June 26, 2017

Rents in Ontario can be hiked 1.8 per cent in 2018 under new guidelines

The Ontario Ministry of Housing has set the rate based on the provincial consumer price index, which measures inflation.

Posted:
June 26, 2017

Safe Streets Act to be challenged in court

The law was created in 1999 to curtail a rise in aggressive panhandling, but it discriminates against people with mental health and addiction issues, say its critics.

Posted:
June 23, 2017

Toronto tenants left in the dark on fire inspections

After a long struggle to obtain information about a fire inspection in his building, a Toronto tenant is calling for more transparency.

Posted:
June 21, 2017

Toronto to move forward with proposed rules on Airbnb-style rentals

Property owners or tenants hosting short-term rentals will have to register with the city, pay an annual fee and remit a tourist tax at a rate still to be determined.

Posted:
June 20, 2017

Adult literacy gets $185 million funding boost from province

Some 80,000 more adult learners will be able to hit the books — upgrading their literacy, math and computer skills — with a $185 million boost from the Ontario government.

Posted:
June 19, 2017

77-year-old seeks court declaration to allow her medically-assisted death

Her doctor is concerned that a lack of clarity about the requirement for her death to be "reasonably foreseeable" leaves him at risk of being charged with murder.

Posted:
June 19, 2017

Supreme Court stands by its controversial ruling to ensure timely trials

In the face of widespread controversy, the country's top court stuck to its gun and said the need for timely trials "cannot be lightly discarded."

Posted:
June 16, 2017

Time for an Indigenous judge on the Supreme Court: Editorial

It's time for the federal government to appoint an Indigenous judge to the Supreme Court of Canada – or explain why not, says this Toronto Star editorial.

Posted:
June 15, 2017

Toronto eyes plan to crack down on Airbnb-style rentals

A licensing system would restrict short-term rentals to the host's main residence and require them to register.

Posted:
June 12, 2017

Bill to ensure Ontario workers can take at least 10 sick days a year without a doctor’s note

Employers will be banned from asking staff for a doctor's note if they take 10 or fewer days a year under legislation proposed to take effect next January.

Posted:
June 08, 2017

Ontario to roll out details of $533M autism program

The long-awaited plan has no age cap, promises kids the intensity and duration of the treatment they need when they need it, the Star has learned.

Posted:
June 08, 2017

Jail sentence for boss who owed workers $125,000

A Brampton-based employer has been handed a rare 30-day jail sentence for failing to pay 43 employees more than $125,000 in wages, as the Ministry of Labour vows to ramp up enforcement.

Posted:
June 07, 2017

Toronto fire department finds 'significant' fire code violations in short-term rentals

Paying guests were ordered to leave after fire inspectors found conditions they termed an "immediate threat to life."

Posted:
June 06, 2017

Haudenosaunee men ordered to pay Enbridge's legal fees

Indigenous protesters Todd Williams and Wayne Hill must pay $18,387.81 and $7,000, respectively, to cover Enbridge's legal fees, a judge has ruled.

Posted:
June 05, 2017

Toronto Life’s reno from hell shines a light on the housing plight of the poor in Parkdale: Keenan

The affordable places for Toronto’s poorest residents to live — in houses, in private rental buildings, in public housing — are either disappearing or falling apart.

Posted:
June 02, 2017

Ottawa spent $707,000 in legal fees fighting decision that protects Indigenous children

Canadian Human Rights Tribunal ruled the government was discriminating against First Nations children by not giving them equitable health and social services payments.

Posted:
June 02, 2017

Ontario Liberals to unveil sweeping labour reforms Tuesday

Premier Kathleen Wynne is set to announce measures including a higher minimum wage, more paid vacation time, greater employee protections and removal of barriers to unionization.

Posted:
May 29, 2017

Opinion: The case for abolishing solitary confinement

Support is growing for a substantial reduction in the use of solitary confinement — good news — but is it enough? Ontario Ombudsman Paul Dubé recently documented the slovenly way solitary is handled: we do a better job in tracking animals than in checking on solitary inmates, he said.

Posted:
May 29, 2017