If your landlord wants to evict you, usually the first step is to give you a written notice. The notice should have a name that starts with Notice to End Your Tenancy. It may have one of these numbers at the top: N4, N5, N6, N7, N8, N12, or N13.... More
After the Landlord and Tenant Board makes an order to evict a tenant, a court official called the Sheriff is in charge of enforcing or carrying out the order. If you have not moved out by the date the eviction order says you must move, the Sheriff... More
If your landlord is trying to evict you for owing rent, you can stop the eviction by paying what you owe. You can do this at any time in the process before the Sheriff comes to change your locks. There is a process the landlord has to follow if they... More
When a landlord wants to evict someone, usually the first step is to give them a written notice. This first notice should have a name that starts with Notice to End Your Tenancy. It may have one of these numbers at the top: N4, N5, N6, N7, N8, N12,... More
If you cannot stop the eviction application from going ahead, then you will have to prepare for the hearing. You might need to arrange for witnesses to come to the hearing. You might need to make copies of papers or photographs you want to use at... More
If you don't go to the hearing, you will not have the chance to tell your side. Even if the Board only hears from your landlord, they can still make a decision about your case. The Board will then send printed copies of their decision to you and... More
If you had a Board hearing about your eviction case, the Board member may have told you their decision at the end of the hearing. Or they may have told you they would make their decision later. Either way, the Board will send printed copies of the... More
In some situations, the Landlord and Tenant Board can make an eviction order without holding a hearing. This is called an "ex parte" order. Your landlord can apply for an ex parte order, without giving you any notices, if your landlord claims that... More
In most situations, it is against the law for your landlord to take your things. But if you leave things behind when you move, your landlord can sell them, keep them, or throw them away. This is true when you move out because of an eviction notice... More
A housing co op is a non-profit corporation made up of members who are all residents of the co op. The members elect the board of directors and usually must help run the co op. Because of this democratic structure, the law has taken a more hands off... More