When you want to rent an apartment or house, you usually need to fill out an application or give some information to the landlord. Before they decide whether or not to rent to you, a landlord can ask:   what your income is if you work,... More
It is your landlord's job to repair and maintain your home. Your landlord must fix or replace anything that is in bad condition or does not work properly. This includes things that came with your place, such as appliances like a fridge or stove. It... More
In Ontario, it is against the law for a landlord to refuse to rent to you because of your: race, colour, or ethnic background birthplace or citizenship religion age (if you are at least 18, or if you are 16 or 17 and not living with a parent) sex,... More
If you can't afford a lawyer or paralegal for your whole case, a lawyer can still help you understand what the law says about your situation and what your options are.Some lawyers provide "unbundled" or “limited scope” services. This means... More
In return for paying rent you get the right to live in a place and treat it as your home. If your building or complex has more than one rental unit, you also have the right to use the common areas. Common areas include things like hallways,... More
Usually, a landlord cannot refuse to rent you a place or discriminate against you in any other way because you have children or because you're pregnant or might become pregnant. The Ontario Human Rights Code protects you from these and many other... More
There are only two kinds of deposit your landlord is allowed to ask for when you rent a new place to live: rent deposit key deposit A rent deposit cannot be more than one month's rent on a yearly or month-to-month rental, or one week's rent on a... More
If you have a problem with cockroaches, bedbugs, mice, or other pests, your landlord must take steps to get rid of them and to stop them from getting in. This is a normal part of the maintenance that landlords must do. You may have to do certain... More
Different landlords might want you to pay rent in different ways. For example, they might ask for: cheque or money order cash debit or credit card pre-authorized bank withdrawals post-dated cheques Your landlord cannot make you pay with post-dated... More
When you first rent a place, you and your landlord agree on the rent you will pay. In most cases, the rent can be any amount that you both agree on.Your rent could include things like:electricitycableparkingcleaningmealsMake sure your rental... More
You don't have to hire a lawyer or paralegal to help you deal with your landlord but they can be very helpful. Lawyers are specially trained to give legal advice. Legal advice means that a lawyer can explain what the law means for your specific... More
No matter what type of heating equipment you have, your landlord must keep it working properly so it can keep your place warm enough. Usually this means at least 20°C from September to June. The exact temperature and dates are different for... More
Most landlords must follow two main rules about when they can increase the rent. Your landlord must: wait at least 12 months before raising your rent give you a written notice at least 90 days before raising your rent 12 months between increases... More
Many of your rights and responsibilities as a tenant are set by Ontario law and not by what your rental agreement says. The law makes certain things part of every rental agreement, even if you and your landlord don't include them. For example, your... More
In most cases, your landlord can only raise your rent by a percentage called the "guideline".The rent increase guidelineThe guideline is set by the government. By the end of each August, the government announces the guideline for the next calendar... More
It is illegal for your landlord to interfere with or cut off any "vital service". This includes hot or cold water, fuel, electricity, natural gas, and heat. Your landlord is not allowed to do this even if you owe rent or for any other reason. Your... More
If you or your guests damage something on purpose, or by not being careful enough, usually you must fix it or pay for the repair. This includes damage to your own unit as well as the common areas. This does not include things that break or wear out... More
If you are protected by the rent guideline and your landlord asks you to agree to a higher increase, you can say no. You do not have to agree or sign anything. If you do not agree, your landlord can apply to the Landlord and Tenant Board for... More
A landlord is allowed to ask if you have pets when you move in. They are also allowed to refuse to rent to you because you have pets.But, after you move in, your landlord cannot evict you just for having a pet, even if your rental agreement has a "... More
Some work that requires a building permit cannot be done while people are living there. If your landlord says you have to move out for this reason, they must give you at least 120 days' notice in writing. The notice should be on a Form N13 from the... More
Sometimes it might seem fair to stop paying some or all of your rent if your landlord isn't giving you what you are paying for. For example, your landlord may be harassing you, invading your privacy, or refusing to do repairs.But it can be very... More
If your rent is overdue by even one day, your landlord might give you a Notice to End your Tenancy Early for Non-payment of Rent (Form N4).  You can cancel this notice by paying all the rent that you owe within 14 days after you get the notice... More
There are different things that your landlord can do if you do not pay your rent on time. If you owe rent If your rent is overdue by even one day, your landlord might give you a Notice to End your Tenancy Early for Non-payment of Rent (Form N4). You... More
The place you are renting is your home. Your landlord must respect your right to have privacy. The reasons listed in Step 2 below are the only reasons your landlord, or anyone working for them, has a right to come in. If they have a valid reason and... More
If you are concerned about your safety or privacy in your home, you might want to change or add a lock. But the law says that you are not allowed to change or add a lock without your landlord's permission. If you do, your landlord could ask the... More
You have the right to use and enjoy your home. The landlord is not allowed to harass you, threaten you, or invade your privacy. Your landlord must also make sure no one working for them or acting on their behalf does any of these things. In some... More
No. You have the right to decide who you want to invite into your home, just as homeowners do. If your landlord tries to control who can visit you, this could be considered harassment. But when you invite or allow people into the building, you could... More
Discrimination is against the law. According to the Ontario Human Rights Code, discrimination in housing means being treated unfairly because of your: race, colour, or ethnic background birthplace or citizenship religion age (if you are at least 18... More
Ontario's Human Rights Code says that if a tenant has a disability, landlords must try to "accommodate" their disability. This means landlords must take away barriers for people with disabilities. They might have to make physical changes to the... More
There are a few different things your landlord can do if they think you have not paid all your rent. Eviction notice Your landlord can try to evict you if they say you owe rent. But they must follow certain steps first. Your landlord must first give... More
If your landlord wants to evict you, usually the first step is to give you a written notice. The notice should have a name that starts with Notice to End Your Tenancy. It may have one of these numbers at the top: N4, N5, N6, N7, N8, N12, or N13.... More
After the Landlord and Tenant Board makes an order to evict a tenant, a court official called the Sheriff is in charge of enforcing or carrying out the order. If you have not moved out by the date the eviction order says you must move, the Sheriff... More
If your landlord is trying to evict you for owing rent, you can stop the eviction by paying what you owe. You can do this at any time in the process before the Sheriff comes to change your locks. There is a process the landlord has to follow if they... More
When a landlord wants to evict someone, usually the first step is to give them a written notice. This first notice should have a name that starts with Notice to End Your Tenancy. It may have one of these numbers at the top: N4, N5, N6, N7, N8, N12,... More
Your landlord can try to evict you if they say you have not paid all your rent. First they must give you a Notice to End your Tenancy Early for Non-payment of Rent (Form N4) with details about what you owe and when you must pay. If you receive a... More
If you cannot stop the eviction application from going ahead, then you will have to prepare for the hearing. You might need to arrange for witnesses to come to the hearing. You might need to make copies of papers or photographs you want to use at... More
If you don't go to the hearing, you will not have the chance to tell your side. Even if the Board only hears from your landlord, they can still make a decision about your case. The Board will then send printed copies of their decision to you and... More
If you had a Board hearing about your eviction case, the Board member may have told you their decision at the end of the hearing. Or they may have told you they would make their decision later. Either way, the Board will send printed copies of the... More
In some situations, the Landlord and Tenant Board can make an eviction order without holding a hearing. This is called an "ex parte" order. Your landlord can apply for an ex parte order, without giving you any notices, if your landlord claims that... More
In most situations, it is against the law for your landlord to take your things. But if you leave things behind when you move, your landlord can sell them, keep them, or throw them away. This is true when you move out because of an eviction notice... More
In most situations, you have to tell your landlord in writing that you want to end your tenancy and move out. This is called giving notice. If you don't give proper notice, you could end up owing more rent. For your notice to be legal, you must:... More
In most situations you have to tell your landlord in writing that you want to end your tenancy and move out. This is called giving notice. If you don't give proper notice, you could end up owing more rent. For your notice to be legal, you must:... More
In most situations you have to tell your landlord in writing that you want to end your tenancy and move out. This is called giving notice. If you don't give proper notice, you could end up owing more rent. For your notice to be legal, you must:... More
In most situations, you have to tell your landlord in writing that you want to end your tenancy and move out. This is called giving notice. If you don't give proper notice, you could end up owing more rent. If you live in a care home or retirement... More
If you do not give proper notice and do not take any other steps to end your tenancy, your tenancy might continue for a period of time after you move out. This means you could owe rent for that time. In this situation, your landlord must try to find... More
You may want to move out before the end of your lease or when it's too late to give enough notice. In these situations, there are things you can do to avoid owing more rent: get your landlord to agree to end your tenancy find another tenant to take... More
Sometimes tenants who want to leave on short notice or before the end of their lease think about trying to get evicted. For example, they might have loud parties, or stop paying rent, hoping the landlord will give them an eviction notice. They hope... More
When you move out, try to make sure your place is reasonably clean and not damaged. If your landlord claims you left the place damaged or dirty, they might come after you for money. If you paid a security deposit when you moved in, they might try to... More
Make sure you take all your belongings with you when you leave your place, unless you are subletting to someone who has agreed to take care of your stuff.  Your landlord can keep, sell, or throw out anything you leave behind when you move out... More
Tenants can be evicted only for the reasons listed in Ontario's Residential Tenancies Act (RTA). Here are some examples: Non-payment By far, the most common cause of eviction is tenants being behind in their rent payments. This is... More
A housing co op is a non-profit corporation made up of members who are all residents of the co op. The members elect the board of directors and usually must help run the co op. Because of this democratic structure, the law has taken a more hands off... More
Keeping cool at home can become a challenge at least on some days and in some parts of Ontario. Excessive heat is not just a matter of comfort but can be a danger to people's health and even their lives.Here are some of the legal issues that... More
When a tenant dies and there are no other tenants living in that unit, the landlord has to keep their belongings safe for at least 30 days. The tenant's relatives or "legal representative" (usually the executor named in the will) must arrange for... More