Child custody means having the legal right to make major decisions about how to care for and raise your child. Custody is not about who your child lives with or how much time your child spends with each of you. For example, even if you have custody... More
You and your partner have to decide who your child lives with after you separate or divorce. This is called deciding your child's residence. Deciding your child’s residence is different from custody. Custody means having the legal right to make... More
You or your partner may want or need to change your court order because of changes to your situation. For example: Your child's living arrangements have changed. Your child has new medical needs. Your child has new education needs. Either you or... More
Generally a child cannot decide which parent they want to live with. But as a child gets closer to the age of majority, which is 18 years old in Ontario, they have more say about where and with whom they live. And it is rare for a court to make a... More
Generally, it's best for your child to spend time with you and your partner after you separate or divorce. This doesn't mean your child has to spend an equal amount of time with both of you. But it should be enough time to allow your child to have a... More
Grandparents have the legal right to apply to the court to ask for access to their grandchildren. They may do this: after their child separates or gets divorced after their child dies after their child dies and the surviving parent moves with the... More
An assessment is a report prepared by an expert, called an assessor, to help you and your partner and the court make decisions about custody, access, and parenting arrangements. Custody and access assessors can be psychologists, social workers,... More
Until there is an agreement or court order about custody and access, you and your partner cannot make any major decisions about your child without the other's approval. This includes where your child lives. If you send your child to live in another... More
It's hard to know what you may be asked when travelling to another country. Officials in Canada or in the other country you are going to can ask you for documents to prove you can travel with your child. These officials can decide whether to let you... More
There are many reasons why you may want to move with your child, like: a new job better housing to be closer to family or a support system a new partner Whether you can move with your child or not, depends on: where you want to move to whether... More
If you and your partner agree on child custody, access, and parenting arrangements, you can put what you've agreed on in a parenting plan or separation agreement. This is a written contract that you and your partner make. Your agreement can deal... More
If you and your partner cannot agree on custody, access, and parenting arrangements, with or without the help of lawyers, you have two options. You can ask a family law professional to help you resolve your issues. Or, you can go to court and ask a... More
It's not unusual for a child to say they don't want to visit the other parent. If you have an agreement or court order that says your partner has access rights, your child must usually go on the visit. This may apply even if your child is not... More
Even though you may have a custody and access schedule, a parenting plan, a separation agreement, or court order that says when your partner will spend time with your child, they may not always show up. This can be very upsetting for your child and... More
Even though you may have a custody and access schedule, a parenting plan, a separation agreement, or court order that says when you spend time with your child, your partner may not let you see your child. This can be very upsetting for your child... More
You or your partner may want or need to change your parenting plan or separation agreement because of changes to your situation. For example: Your child's living arrangements have changed. Your child has new medical needs. Your child has new... More
You or your partner may want or need to change your final court order because of changes to your situation. For example: Your child's living arrangements have changed. Your child has new medical needs. Your child has new education needs. Either you... More
When parents separate or divorce, it's a stressful time for the entire family – for the parents and for the children. Children can feel like they have no control over what is happening and that can make them worry. Your child likely has lots of... More
There is a risk that you will not be able to enforce your court order on the reserve. It depends on things like:which First Nation reserve your former partner lives onif that First Nation has its own laws about children who live with members of the... More