The law says that employers can ask questions about whether you're qualified and able to do the job. For example, if you need a driver's licence for a delivery job, an employer can ask if you have one. And an employer can ask if you've had other... More
It depends on your job. Ontario's Employment Standards Act (ESA) has minimum standards that employers must follow. For example, there are rules about: hours of work minimum wage vacation pay, holiday pay, and time off from work But not all jobs... More
If you're fired from your job, your employer has to: pay you any wages they owe you produce a Record of Employment Rules in Ontario's Employment Standards Act Ontario's Employment Standards Act (ESA) has rules about what your employer has to do... More
There are laws that say your employer can't punish you for acting on your rights. Your rights in the Employment Standards Act Ontario's Employment Standards Act (ESA) says that your employer can't punish you or threaten to punish you for: asking... More
If an employer discriminates against you in a way that goes against Ontario's human rights laws, you might be able to make a claim against the employer. You do this with the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario. The Tribunal could order the employer to... More
You have the right to be safe at work. Almost every worker, employer, and workplace in Ontario has to follow the safety rules in the Ontario Health and Safety Act (OHSA). The OHSA applies to employees, employers, and independent contractors. There... More
In most jobs, you have the right to get public holidays off work with holiday pay. Some people call them statutory holidays. Ontario's Employment Standards Act (ESA) has minimum standards that employers must follow. This includes rules about public... More
You will need a Social Insurance Number (SIN). A SIN is a 9-digit number that you need to work in Canada or to use government programs and get benefits. Your employer uses your SIN on forms that they have to fill out related to your work. For... More
Ontario's Employment Standards Act (ESA) has minimum standards that employers must follow. This includes rules about minimum wage.Minimum wage may go up each year on October 1. The amounts below are as of October 1, 2016.In most jobs, you must... More
Sometimes being forced out of a job is the same as being fired. The law calls this constructive dismissal. Constructive dismissal happens when your employer does something that: changes things at work for you in a major way, is not something you... More
There are laws to protect workers who want to claim their rights. But employers sometimes don't follow these laws. To help you decide what to do, you may want to talk to someone and find out about: your legal options what result you want to get how... More
Human rights laws say that employers must not discriminate against you. And if other workers discriminate against you, your employer must take steps to make them stop. If harassment goes against your human rights it is a kind of discrimination. This... More
You have the right to know about anything dangerous in your workplace. The dangers could include equipment, situations, chemicals, or people. Your employer must give you the information, training, and supervision you need to do your job safely.... More
Ontario's Employment Standards Act (ESA) calls time off for illnesses and other personal emergencies "personal emergency leave". You have the right to personal emergency leave if: you're covered by the ESA, and you work for a company that regularly... More
In most workplaces, the minimum age to work is 14. But it depends on the job. For example, you have to be: 14 to work in a store or as a waiter 15 to work in a restaurant kitchen 16 to work on a construction project 18 to sell or serve alcohol (but... More
The Employment Standards Act (ESA) has minimum standards that employers must follow. This includes rules about overtime pay. In most jobs, when you work more than 44 hours in a week, the hours above 44 are overtime hours. You earn 1½ times your... More
Ontario's Employment Standards Act gives most people the right to 2 weeks of vacation in a year. They earn this by working 12 months for the same employer. Some workers may get more vacation time, based on what their employer agrees to give them or... More
In most cases, your employer must give you notice in writing if you're fired. There are 2 ways that an employer can give you notice: Your employer can tell you ahead of time. The amount of time can depend on many things, including how long you've... More
Ontario's Employment Standards Act (ESA) has minimum standards that employers must follow. For example, there are rules about:hours of workminimum wagevacation pay, holiday pay, and time off from workBut not all jobs are covered by the ESA. And, for... More
Usually, the answer is no. Ontario's human rights laws make it difficult for employers to force workers to get tested to show if they used drugs or alcohol at work or before coming to work. An employer is not supposed to test workers just to find... More
You have the right to give your ideas about the safety policies at your job. Health and safety representative If your workplace has between 6 and 19 workers, it must have a health and safety representative. This is someone who you and the other... More
Most people are hired without having a written contract. But an employer may want you to sign a contract. A contract might include things like: your hours of work whether the job includes shift work where you will be working how much vacation you... More
Yes. The Employment Standards Act (ESA) has rules about overtime. And the normal ESA rules that apply to most workers are that the hours they work over 44 hours a week are overtime hours. But an employer can ask you to sign an agreement that has... More
Ontario's Employment Standards Act gives most people the right to 2 weeks of paid vacation in a year. They earn this by working 12 months for the same employer. Some workers may get more vacation time, based on what their employer agrees to give... More
No, your employer does not have to give you a reason. But in most cases, if you're fired your employer must give you written notice of termination. And in some cases, they can fire you without giving you notice. Why employers don't give reasons... More
If an employer has not followed Ontario's Employment Standards Act (ESA) you may be able to make a claim with the Ministry of Labour. For example, you can make a claim if your employer has: paid you less than minimum wage not paid you what they owe... More
If an employer discriminates against you in a way that goes against Ontario's human rights laws, you might be able to make a claim against the employer. You do this with the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario. The Tribunal could order the employer to... More
You and your employer are both responsible for keeping your workplace safe. But, the law says that you have different responsibilities based on your roles. As a worker, you must: follow the safety policies in your workplace, unless they put you in... More
You don't have to pay money or a fee to an employer so that you can start work. But before they hire you, an employer might ask you to pay for things like: looking at your job application supplies or equipment that you need to do the job training... More
Yes, in some situations, like the ones below. Temporary layoff Ontario's Employment Standards Act (ESA) says you can be laid off without getting any notice of termination if the layoff is temporary. For example, your employer might not have enough... More
If you left your job or got fired, you might have a claim against your employer. And you might have the option of suing your employer in court.But if you're a unionized worker, you can't sue your employer in court. Talk to your shop steward or union... More
Ontario's human rights laws say that everyone has the right to be treated equally and not be discriminated against at work. This means that your employer must do what they can to make things fair for you. This could mean doing things differently for... More
Health and safety representative If your workplace has between 6 and 19 workers, it must have a health and safety representative. This is someone who you and the other workers choose. They must be a worker, not a manager. Their role is to deal with... More
If you need 10 days or less, you might be able to take personal emergency leave. If you need to be away more than 10 days and you're covered by Ontario's Employment Standards Act (ESA) you might be able to take: family caregiver leave family... More
An employer might offer you a job "on probation". Probation is like a trial period so they can decide if they want to keep you in the job. Probation is often 3 to 6 months but could be longer. If your employer provides benefits, like paying for... More
In most jobs, you have the right to get the day off with holiday pay.In Ontario, there are 9 public holidays each year. Some people call these "stat holidays".New Year’s DayJanuary 1Family Daythird Monday of FebruaryGood FridayFriday before Easter... More
In Ontario's Employment Standards Act (ESA), severance pay is not the same thing as termination pay, which is also called pay in lieu of notice. Severance pay is another payment that some people get when they lose their jobs. You can find out more... More
After you send in your claim, the Ministry gives you a "claim submission number". Use this number if you have to contact the Ministry to find out what's happening with your claim. If you send your claim in online, you get the number right away.... More
Ontario's human rights laws say that everyone has the right to be treated equally and not be discriminated against at work. This means that your employer must do what they can to make things fair for you. This could mean doing things differently for... More
You can refuse to do a task your employer gives you if you think it's dangerous for you or someone else. It does not matter if other people did the task before and didn’t have an accident. You don't have to ask anyone for permission before you... More
If you're going to have a baby, Ontario law says that you can take time off work without losing your job. This is called taking a leave. For information about parental leave, which is for new birth parents and adopting parents, see I'm going to be a... More
If you're being trained while you're doing the job, the employer usually has to pay you at least minimum wage. Ontario's Employment Standards Act (ESA) has minimum standards that employers must follow, such as rules about minimum wage. But not all... More
The law says that your employer must take money from your pay for things like: income tax Employment Insurance (EI) premiums Canada Pension Plan (CPP) contributions These are called "statutory deductions". Your employer sends this money to the... More
Sometimes employers stop people from working for a while or reduce their hours by: sending them home from work early telling them not to come to work for a period of time not scheduling them for shifts or giving them hours of work You lose money... More
Employment Standards Officers (ESO) decide employment standards claims made to the Ministry of Labour. If you disagree with what the ESO decided, you can ask the Ontario Labour Relations Board (Labour Board) to review the decision. You can ask for a... More
It depends on why they're asking and what kind of information they want. Asking about a criminal record An employer can ask you if you've been convicted of a crime that you have not been given a record suspension for. A record suspension used to be... More
Both the Occupational Health and Safety Act (OHSA) and the Canada Labour Code say that your employer can't punish you because you ask them to follow safety rules. This applies if you complain to your employer about safety issues or ask them about... More
If you're going to have a baby or adopt a child, Ontario law says that you can take time off work without losing your job. This is called taking a leave. For information about pregnancy leave, which is for women who are pregnant or who have just... More
Do not let your employer talk you out of making a claim for workers' compensation benefits. If you think your injury may be related to your job, you should claim benefits from the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board. If your employer will not... More
Ontario's Employment Standards Act (ESA) says that on or before your payday, your employer must give you a statement of your wages. This is often called a pay stub. The pay stub must include: your rate of pay, for example, how much you make in an... More
If you left your job or got fired, you might have a claim against the employer. You might be able to make an employment standards claim to the Ministry of Labour. And you might have the option of suing your employer in court. If you're trying to get... More
If someone at work is trying to make you afraid, uncomfortable, or angry, they may be harassing you. Workplace harassment is a series of comments or actions that the person knows you don't like. It can also include things they should know that you... More
An independent contractor is someone who runs their own business. Independent contractors are self-employed and do not have the same rights as employees. Some employers ask people to agree that they're running their own business and selling their... More
It's helpful to first read How do I sue my former employer in Small Claims Court? It talks about who can sue and how to start the process. There are a lot of rules you have to follow when you sue someone in Small Claims Court. The court has... More
Workplace violence is anything a person does because they want to hurt you or someone else at your job. It also includes: any time someone threatens to hurt another person, even if they don't act on it sexual violence or domestic violence, even if... More
If you work some place where people leave tips, like a restaurant or a hair or nail salon, you get to keep the tips people give you. That's the general rule in the Employment Standards Act (ESA). But there are 2 exceptions to this rule: Your... More
If you or another worker makes a complaint about health and safety issues to the Ministry of Labour, the Ministry sends an inspector to your workplace to look at the situation and to make sure the rules are being followed. The inspector conducts an... More
Just because the court ordered your employer to pay you money, does not mean that you automatically get the money. If your employer does not obey the court order, you have to take steps to try to make them pay. You won't be able to collect from the... More
The Occupational Health and Safety Act (OHSA) says that your employer can't punish you because you ask them to follow safety rules. If you've been punished for asking about your rights or complaining about health and safety concerns, this is called... More
Before you have a hearing or consultation at the Ontario Labour Relations Board (OLRB), you must: Give your application to the OLRB. This is called "filing" your application. Work with a Labour Relations Officer to see if you and your employer can... More
Ontario's Employment Standards Act (ESA) has minimum standards that employers must follow. This includes rules about hours of work. In most jobs, your employer can say you have to work 8 hours a day. If your employer's regular work day is more than... More
Ontario's Employment Standards Act (ESA) has minimum standards that employers must follow. This includes rules about hours of work and breaks. In most jobs, you get at least 30 minutes off after every 5 hours of work. Your employer does not have to... More
Ontario's Employment Standards Act (ESA) has minimum standards that employers must follow. This includes rules about how many hours you have to work. Even if these rules apply to you, your employer can ask you to work longer hours. You can refuse to... More
Ontario's Employment Standards Act (ESA) has minimum standards that employers must follow. This includes rules about the maximum number of hours you have to work and breaks. But there is no rule about when your employer has to give you your work... More
If you have a union at work: your collective agreement sets out your conditions of employment, like wages, hours of work, and overtime pay what's in the collective agreement is decided through collective bargaining you pay union dues, which your... More
Most workers in Ontario have the right to join a union. For unionized workers, conditions of employment are set out in a collective agreement. The agreement talks about things like wages, hours of work, and overtime pay. Collective agreements set... More
Your collective agreement sets out conditions of employment. The agreement usually covers things like wages, hours of work, and overtime pay. It's up to the union to make sure your employer follows the agreement. So you need to start by talking to... More
When you're in a union, you have to use the process in the collective agreement if your employer does not follow what the agreement says. The one time you don't have to do this is if your complaint is about something that goes against your human... More
This answer is taken from "Applying for EI — Changes to the Record of Employment form" produced by Community Advocacy & Legal Centre. Employers complete Records of Employment (ROEs) for employees receiving insurable earnings who then stop... More
The following answer is taken from Migrant Workers and Workers' Compensation: What You Should Know produced by Industrial Accident Victims' Group of Ontario. It is best for your case if you and your employer tell the Workplace Safety & Insurance... More