Partner abuse happens when your partner tries to control you, or make you afraid of them. Abuse can happen in any relationship. Partner abuse is also called domestic violence or family violence.Kinds of abuseAbuse can be physical, sexual, emotional... More
Staying safe after you leave an abusive relationship is important.You might be able to talk to your partner to make an agreement about when, where, and how they may contact you or your children. But if you feel unsafe or uncomfortable, you don't... More
You may need different kinds of help and support when you leave an abusive relationship. Legal advice A lawyer has special training that allows them to give legal advice. Legal advice means that a lawyer can explain how the law applies to your... More
Both parents have an equal legal right to custody of their child when their relationship ends. No parent has a greater legal right to custody over the other parent, even if they did most of the child care or were abused by the other parent. Only a... More
If you or someone you love is in danger from abuse, you need to get emergency help right away. You may have someone you can call who can help right away. You may also want to contact the police by calling 911. If you call 911, the police are allowed... More
You might be worried about your child being alone with your abusive partner after you separate. Most children are affected when one parent is abusive to the other, even if they are not directly abused themselves.What you do to make sure your child... More
Your abusive partner might use threats about your child to try to keep you from leaving. Or, they might make threats after you separate. They might say that they will take your child away from you and not let you see them.Not everyone follows... More
It can be very difficult to bring your child back to Canada from another country. You need to act quickly. Sometimes, you can get help from authorities in Canada. Other times, you have to get a court order from the other country. It depends on which... More
It can take a long time to resolve your issues. There are many steps in the family court process before a trial. Most family law cases are resolved by reaching an agreement before you would need a trial.If you need a court order quickly, you can... More
If you or someone else calls the police about your partner's abuse, the police decide what happens. You do not decide.If the police think that there are "reasonable grounds" to believe that someone committed a crime, they must charge that person... More
If you or someone else calls the police about your partner’s abuse, the police decide what happens. You do not decide.If the police think that there are "reasonable grounds" to believe that someone committed a crime, they must charge that person... More
You may have family law and criminal law issues at the same time.The Ontario Court of Justice has an Integrated Domestic Violence Court at 311 Jarvis Street in Toronto. The same judge hears both the family law and criminal law cases that involve... More
Partner abuse can affect your family law issues in many important ways:It can make it difficult to talk with your partner safely and fairly when trying to resolve family law issues like child custody and access or spousal support.It can affect the... More
Your partner might threaten to have you deported from Canada if you report their abuse or if you leave them. Deported from Canada means being forced to leave the country. Your partner does not have the right to have you deported. Only federal... More
Elder abuse can take many different forms, such as physical abuse, financial abuse, mental abuse, and neglect. Elder abuse is often a crime, such as assault, fraud, or withholding food or other necessities of life. If you suspect elder abuse, you... More
This answer is taken from CLEO's On the Radar - June 2013.  Long-term care homes and retirement homes Reporting abuse is mandatory when the victim lives in a long-term care home or a retirement home. (For an explanation of these terms, see CLEO... More
The law says that anyone - for example, a teacher, doctor, neighbour, or relative - who suspects that a child is being harmed or at risk of being harmed, must report it to a children's aid society. In fact, for most professionals, it is an offence... More