Find Common Questions

At the end of your trial, the judge makes a decision using the family law rules and laws and the evidence you give. They make decisions using a test called the balance of probabilities. This means that your evidence has to be more believable than...
The law says that married couples usually share the value of their property if they separate or divorce. This means that the partner who has more property usually pays money to the partner who has less property. Usually, the property itself is not...
In Ontario's Employment Standards Act (ESA), severance pay is not the same thing as termination pay, which is also called pay in lieu of notice. Severance pay is another payment that some people get when they lose their jobs. You can find out more...
Sometimes employers stop people from working for a while or reduce their hours by: sending them home from work early telling them not to come to work for a period of time not scheduling them for shifts or giving them hours of work You lose money...
No, your employer does not have to give you a reason. But in most cases, if you're fired your employer must give you written notice of termination. And in some cases, they can fire you without giving you notice. Why employers don't give reasons...
There are laws that say your employer can't punish you for acting on your rights. Your rights in the Employment Standards Act Ontario's Employment Standards Act (ESA) says that your employer can't punish you or threaten to punish you for: asking...
If an employer has not followed Ontario's Employment Standards Act (ESA) you may be able to make a claim with the Ministry of Labour. For example, you can make a claim if your employer has: paid you less than minimum wage not paid you what they owe...
After you send in your claim, the Ministry gives you a "claim submission number". Use this number if you have to contact the Ministry to find out what's happening with your claim. If you send your claim in online, you get the number right away....
Employment Standards Officers (ESO) decide employment standards claims made to the Ministry of Labour. If you disagree with what the ESO decided, you can ask the Ontario Labour Relations Board (Labour Board) to review the decision. You can ask for a...
If you left your job or got fired, you might have a claim against the employer. You might be able to make an employment standards claim to the Ministry of Labour. And you might have the option of suing your employer in court. If you're trying to get...
It's helpful to first read How do I sue my former employer in Small Claims Court? It talks about who can sue and how to start the process. There are a lot of rules you have to follow when you sue someone in Small Claims Court. The court has...
Ontario's Employment Standards Act (ESA) has minimum standards that employers must follow. For example, there are rules about:hours of workminimum wagevacation pay, holiday pay, and time off from workBut not all jobs are covered by the ESA. And, for...
There are laws to protect workers who want to claim their rights. But employers sometimes don't follow these laws. To help you decide what to do, you may want to talk to someone and find out about: your legal options what result you want to get how...
If an employer discriminates against you in a way that goes against Ontario's human rights laws, you might be able to make a claim against the employer. You do this with the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario. The Tribunal could order the employer to...
Usually, the answer is no. Ontario's human rights laws make it difficult for employers to force workers to get tested to show if they used drugs or alcohol at work or before coming to work. An employer is not supposed to test workers just to find...
If an employer discriminates against you in a way that goes against Ontario's human rights laws, you might be able to make a claim against the employer. You do this with the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario. The Tribunal could order the employer to...
Ontario's human rights laws say that everyone has the right to be treated equally and not be discriminated against at work. This means that your employer must do what they can to make things fair for you. This could mean doing things differently for...
It depends on why they're asking and what kind of information they want. Asking about a criminal record An employer can ask you if you've been convicted of a crime that you have not been given a record suspension for. A record suspension used to be...
You have the right to be safe at work. Almost every worker, employer, and workplace in Ontario has to follow the safety rules in the Ontario Health and Safety Act (OHSA). The OHSA applies to employees, employers, and independent contractors. There...
You have the right to know about anything dangerous in your workplace. The dangers could include equipment, situations, chemicals, or people. Your employer must give you the information, training, and supervision you need to do your job safely....
You have the right to give your ideas about the safety policies at your job. Health and safety representative If your workplace has between 6 and 19 workers, it must have a health and safety representative. This is someone who you and the other...
You and your employer are both responsible for keeping your workplace safe. But, the law says that you have different responsibilities based on your roles. As a worker, you must: follow the safety policies in your workplace, unless they put you in...
Health and safety representative If your workplace has between 6 and 19 workers, it must have a health and safety representative. This is someone who you and the other workers choose. They must be a worker, not a manager. Their role is to deal with...
You can refuse to do a task your employer gives you if you think it's dangerous for you or someone else. It does not matter if other people did the task before and didn’t have an accident. You don't have to ask anyone for permission before you...
Both the Occupational Health and Safety Act (OHSA) and the Canada Labour Code say that your employer can't punish you because you ask them to follow safety rules. This applies if you complain to your employer about safety issues or ask them about...