I heard from a friend that the police want to talk to me about a house party I went to with my friend. What happens if the police think I've committed a crime?

Question: 
I heard from a friend that the police want to talk to me about a house party I went to with my friend. What happens if the police think I've committed a crime?
Answer: 

The police use their judgment to decide what to do. They think about many things, such as the type of crime, your age, and if you've been in trouble with the police or the courts in the past.

Your lawyer explains the process and gives you advice about what might happen at each step. It's important to speak to your lawyer before you talk to the police.

The flowchart below shows what might happen if the police suspect that you've committed a crime ( PDF).pdficon_small

flowchart

Does this flowchart apply to me?

This flowchart is taken from the CLEO's Youth Criminal Law website, which has information about the Youth Criminal Justice Act. The Act applies if you're at least 12 but younger than 18 when you're accused of committing a crime. The Act creates special rules and procedures for young people. The Act only applies if you're accused of breaking a federal law. Federal laws apply in all Canadian provinces and territories. The main federal law is the Criminal Code. Things like theft and assault are crimes under the Criminal Code.

Related Resource: 
Resource notes: 

See also: Talking to police

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